Images by B. Charnley

Audio available: Intellectual Property and the Biosciences: Past Trends and Future Directions Workshop, Griffith University, South Bank, 7 & 8 July 2014

Welcome to the IPBio (Intellectual Property in the Biosciences) Network homepage.

We are an international group of scholars with a shared research interest in the History of Intellectual Property in the Biosciences and its relevance to current policy. The network's participants hail from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds including law, philosophy, history, sociology and science studies. We seek to encourage an interdisciplinary and intersectoral conversation on the past, present and future of IP in the biosciences.

Robert Cook-Deegan at Patenting Life: genes and generations. Download this talk: .wav [107MB], .mp3 [14MB], .mp4 [84MB].

The network was established in Berlin, 2008 at the Living Properties Workshop, hosted by the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science. Further public events have been held at the University of Leeds, University of York, University of Exeter and at the ISHPSSB 2013 meeting at the University of Montpellier. In 2012 a second workshop, Plants, Animals and Ownership, was held at Yale University.

This homepage is intended as a focal point for our activities. It provides contact details for the network's participants, monthly news of activities and events in which network members are involved, a quarterly newsletter and a news archive.

Our resources area provides links to hundreds of freely available papers, books, bibliographies and videos and presentations from IPBio partners, on subjects including genetics, biotechnology, plant breeding and stem cells and their historical and contemporary relationship to intellectual property of all types.

We also have an extensive list of links to sites that deal with bioscience, patents, trademarks, copyright and UPOV. Finally, this homepage hosts a blog which we use for notes, scribbles and work in progress.


Graham Dutfield at Patenting Life: genes and generations. Download this talk: .wav [103MB], .mp3 [15MB]

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